Invited Speakers

Robot 2015 will feature three Plenary Talks:

Manuela Veloso - Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Title: Symbiotic Autonomous Mobile Service Robots 

Bill Smart - Oregon State University, USA

Title: How the Law Will Think About Robots (and Why You Should Care)

Jon Agirre Ibarbia - TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Spain

Title: Applications in Flexible Manufacturing with Humans and Robots

 


Symbiotic Autonomous Mobile Service Robots

 Manuela Veloso - Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Brief Bio

Manuela M. Veloso is the Herbert A. Simon University Professor in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University, with courtesy appointments in the Robotics Institute, Machine Learning, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering Departments. She researches in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. She founded and directs the CORAL research laboratory, for the study of autonomous agents that Collaborate, Observe, Reason, Act, and Learn, www.cs.cmu.edu/~coral. Professor Veloso is IEEE Fellow, AAAS Fellow, AAAI Fellow, and the past President of AAAI and RoboCup. Professor Veloso and her students have worked with a variety of autonomous robots, including mobile service robots and soccer robots. The CoBot service robots have autonomously navigated for more than 1,000km in multi-floor office buildings. See www.cs.cmu.edu/~mmv for further information, including publications.

Abstract

We aim at and research on autonomous mobile robots that coexist and interact with humans while performing tasks. I will present symbiotic robot autonomy, in which robots are robustly autonomous in their localization and navigation, as well as handle their limitations by proactively asking for help from humans, accessing the web for missing knowledge, and coordinating with other robots. Such symbiotic autonomy has enabled our CoBot robots to move in our multi-floor buildings for more than 1,000km performing a variety of service tasks, including escorting visitors, and transporting packages between locations. I will also present the language-based human-robot interaction, in particular for the human use of complex commands. The work is joint with my research group, in particular with Joydeep Biswas, Brian Coltin, Stephanie Rosenthal, and Vittorio Perera.


How the Law Will Think About Robots (and Why You Should Care)

  Bill Smart - Oregon State University, USA

Brief Bio

Bill Smart is an Associate Professor in the Robotics Program at Oregon State University, where he directs the Personal Robotics Group. His research interests span the areas of mobile robotics, machine learning, and human-robot interaction.  He holds a Ph.D. and Sc.M., both in Computer Science, from Brown University, an M.Sc. in Intelligent Robotics from the University of Edinburgh, and a B.Sc. (hons) in Computer Science from the University of Dundee. His recent research has focused on assistive robotics for people with severe motor disabilities, the use of robots in the fight against highly-infectious diseases, technologies for protecting privacy when using mobile telepresence systems, and the interaction between robotics, public policy, and the law.

Abstract

As robots and robotic devices begin to enter our everyday lives in the coming years, legislation will be written to govern them. This legislation will typically not be written by robot-savvy technologists. It will be written and passed by lawyers and legal scholar, based on their understanding of what a robot is, and what it can do. How we talk to lawmakers about robots and robotics technologies will have a profound impact on what laws are passed and on the legal frameworks that emerge. In this paper, we argue that we must be careful about the metaphors we use to describe our systems when talking to lawmakers, and draw some parallels from the now well-established field of cyberlaw. We briefly discuss what it means to "think like a lawyer", and show how using different metaphors for our systems could lead to radically different legislation being passed. Finally, we describe and discuss what we call the Android Fallacy; the pitfall of thinking about robots as anything other than (potentially very sophisticated) deterministic machines. 


Applications in Flexible Manufacturing with Humans and Robots

   Jon Agirre Ibarbia - TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Spain

Brief Bio

Graduated in 1991 at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, in Telecommunication Engineering. He has a master on Industrial Software Engineering (1995), at EHU-UPV University. Since 1995, Jon Agirre Ibarbia is working in TECNALIA as co-ordinator in R&D projects related to Manufacturing automation and Robotics and Head of Strategic Research Programmes for Manufacturing and Robotics. Jon Agirre participates in ManuFuture European Technology Platform and European Factories of the Future Research Association (EFFRA) for FoF PPP and is currently Member of the Board of Directors of euRobotics aisbl (the private part of the H2020 SPARC PPP for Robotics in Europe). Since 2010 is member of the H2020 LEIT-NMBP Advisory Group for the EC. Since 2010, he has organised a series of Entrepreneurship workshops at the European Robotics Forum

Abstract

Two main drivers for the manufacturing automation lead to Flexibility in Robotics. From one side, changes in robotics technology that allow new areas for automation of the factories (for example, the collaborative robotics and their potential in automation new assembly processes) and changes in products/parts that require new manufacturing processes, new production equipment and new flexible automation. This talk presents those trends with examples of research projects as much applied as possible.


 

 

 

Important Dates

Special Session Proposals:

May 10, 2015

Special Session Acceptance:

May 25, 2015

Paper Submission (extended):

July 20, 2015 

Notification:

September 11, 2015

Early Registration:

September 21, 2015

Camera Ready:

September 21, 2015

Registration Limit:

October 30, 2015

Conference:

November 19-21, 2015

Organized by:

 

 

 

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